Sunday, May 16, 2010

Why American’s Identities are Easily Stolen

Analysis: Technology exists to bolster security, but Americans and politicians are reluctant to use it.

We can fix this thing, but we won't because we don't want to be inconvenienced. I'm introduced to amazing technologies every week that will stop this. All they need is government support and system-wide adoption. Meanwhile, Chuck Schumer and Ed Markey and the rest of the grand standing poArtwork: Chip Taylorliticians scream about privacy and security issues when they see an opportunity for publicity, but their follow-through is less than satisfactory.

We use easily counterfeited identification, Social Security numbers that are written on the sides of buses and we rely on the anonymity of the phone, fax, internet and snail mail as a means of application. (See also our cybersecurity quiz.)

In other countries they solve problems. They have priorities and don't deal with the rhetoric. They put security first, convenience secnd.

International Solutions

Cedric Pariente from B32Trust tells us that in Paris, France you need to open an account first before a loan is granted by a bank. In order to do so, you need to provide them with a printed copy of your ID card and proof that you still live where you claim to live (last electricity bill usually.) Then they can check your credit history and decide to grant you with a loan or not. Most of the time, they just check that your debt is not over 30% of your income. You have to be a bank client. Doesn't seem they allow phone, fax, internet or snail mail transaction when granting credit.

In the UK, Keith Appleyard echoed something similar to France's system: you have to present yourself in person with a Government-issued Photo ID such as Passport or Drivers License, plus a proof of address less than 3 months old, such as a bank statement or utility bill. Keith further explained the whole UK population had vetting their Identity Credentials and one of the last people to be vetted was the Queen of England, but she is not exempt. So she meets with her Bankers, but she doesn't have a Passport or Birth Certificate or Drivers License. So she asks them to take a Sterling Currency note out of their wallet, points to her picture engraved on the note, and says "yes, that's me". So they officially recorded the Serial Number on the Currency note as being her Identity Document. I think that process may need looking into. pcworld

3 comments:

  1. Nice post; however, the plug and outlet in the picture are not U.S. but likely European. Sure hope someone isn't that stupid, American or not, since that is likely 220V running through the wire instead of the 110V we have in the United States.

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  2. No, Americans are not stupid. The poster of this picture, or should I say the editor of that picture is a complete dumbass. Within a millisecond of seeing that picture, an educated eye can tell is is not an outlet used here in the States.

    What a weak article. Ill explain:
    Analysis: Technology exists to bolster security, but Americans and politicians are reluctant to use it." But no where in this hack article does it mention any of it. I guess you spoke to all of us Americans to query our opinions?

    "I'm introduced to amazing technologies every week that will stop this." Really? Then inform your readers as to what that is.

    "Cedric Pariente from B32Trust tells us that in Paris, France you need to open an account first before a loan is granted by a bank. In order to do so, you need to provide them with a printed copy of your ID card and proof that you still live where you claim to live (last electricity bill usually.)"
    All of which can be achieved with forged documents.

    "and one of the last people to be vetted was the Queen of England,"
    WTF did that have to do with "Why American’s Identities are Easily Stolen "

    Weak reporting.

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  3. after seeing this photo and others like it with the same pool same group of guys and different angles you will actually realize that picture was taken in Europe. on one of the other angles you see a car with a clear view of the license plate. its clearly not from the united states or anywhere on this this continent. and this is why Europeans are retarded

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